Flight Attended offers to Breast-feed Hungry Infant.

2018-11-26_11-43-45

A flight attendant went above and beyond to help a mom who ran out of formula for her infant Tuesday during a domestic Philippine Airlines flight.

Patrisha Organo, a 24-year-old flight attendant and first-time mom, offered to breastfeed the stranger’s baby.

“I heard an infant’s cry, a cry that will make you want to do anything to help,” Organo wrote in a Facebook post along with a photo of her cradling the child.

“I approached the mother and asked if everything’s okay, I tried to tell her to feed her hungry child. Teary-eyed, she told me that she ran out of formula milk. Passengers started looking and staring at the tiny, fragile crying infant.”

“I felt a pinch in my heart,” she continued.

“There’s no formula milk on board. I thought to myself, there’s only one thing I could offer and that’s my own milk. And so I offered.”

Organo said the flight’s supervisor, Sheryl Villaflor, took the mother to a private part of the plane so that she could be there while Organo breastfed the baby.

“The baby started rooting, she was so hungry,” Organo wrote.

“I saw the relief on her mother’s eyes. I continued to feed the baby until she fell asleep. I escorted her back to her seat and just before I left, the mother sincerely thanked me,” she added.

Organo, who describes herself as a breastfeeding advocate, has a 9-month-old baby at home.

Not only was the flight meaningful to Organo because she was able to help a fellow mother in need, but she also aced a “Check flight” evaluation for a new promotion.

The flight’s gonna be special, so special not only because I got qualified as an Evaluator but I got to help,” she wrote.

The Food and Drug Administration warns using breast milk from another mother comes with risks and recommends consulting the child’s health care provider beforehand.

“Risks for the baby include exposure to infectious diseases, including HIV, to chemical contaminants, such as some illegal drugs, and to a limited number of prescription drugs that might be in the human milk, if the donor has not been adequately screened. In addition, if human milk is not handled and stored properly, it could, like any type of milk, become contaminated and unsafe to drink,” reads the FDA’s website.

Advertisements

Categories: Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s